Post vs. Page

If you are using WordPress to create a blog, most of your content is going to be created as posts. Yet, you will still have pages, even if only a “privacy policy” page. Now, what about a website that is not a blog? Should you use pages exclusively? What is the difference between both content types anyway?

Category vs. Tag vs. Keyword

This post is the third (and final) installment in this WordPress taxonomy series. What could be so important with categories and tags that the subject deserves another post?

WordPress tags

Tags offer a great way to manage your content and increase your overall user experience. However, not using them properly could be harmful to your SEO (and visitors experience alike). While some people opt to avoid them altogether, a better approach is to learn how to use them correctly.

WordPress categories

They are designed to help you organize your blog content so that specific information can be easily located. However, they can make or break the blog experience if not use properly. If you don’t change the default way in which WordPress handles them, they can even have a negative impact on SEO. In short, don’t ignore them!

Pretty Permalinks

The permalink structure dictates how WordPress construct the URLs for your web pages. Unbelievably, permalinks can be either pretty or ugly. Is there any ideal permalink structure?

A domain-based or path-based network?

Before creating a Multisite network, you must decide if you want to use subdomains or subdirectories. When it comes to choosing which one is best, there are a few criteria to weigh up.

To www or not to www?

Which between the www and non-www versions of the URL is best? How to implement your decision using WordPress? Can you guess which one I have chosen?